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HOW GENES INFLUENCE OUR HEALTH

A human body consists of approximately 50 trillion cells, and in most cells there is a cell nucleus in which the human chromosomes are embedded. A chromosome can be thought of as a “tightly wound thread”. The so-called DNA double helix.

Your DNA is your genetic code, i.e. the blueprint of your human body. In your case, this genetic code consists of about 3.2 billion letters and about 1% of this code represents the areas we call genes. A gene is an instruction for the body and usually has only one specific function. That is why someone has blue eyes and another has brown . There are also genes that tell the body how to break down food in the intestines to then absorb the nutrients.

Unfortunately, as unique as our genetics make us, our genes are not flawless. Each of us carries certain genetic defects or gene variations that we either inherited from our parents or that formed by chance and now negatively affect our health. These gene variations are very common and are usually just simple letter changes in the genetic code. The different variations weaken our immune system, increase our risk of heart attack, or give us bad eyesight. Of course, each of us carries different variations, which means that some people have a higher risk of heart attack and others cannot tolerate lactose, for example. Diseases clustered in certain families. As part of each individual analysis, we have had each gene studied for you and have summarized the most important scientific content for you in the categories below.

The scientific publications on which the analyses are based can also be found at the end.

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BEYOND DNA WEIGHT - THE SCIENCE OF GENES.

The scientific basis for this gene analysis is unusually strong. On the one hand, the relevant genes have already been studied in more detail in numerous studies (more than 7500 studies for the PPARG gene, 167 studies for the FABP2 gene, 6897 studies for the ADRB2 gene and 493 studies for FTO). The weight analysis is based on the most important 53 studies on weight loss and nutrition.

Analyzed in this analysis are 8 polymorphisms that have different effects on the body. Since this is a very large analysis product, this description focuses only on the most important statements.

These are:

  • People respond differently to dietary fat content due to genetic polymorphisms. It makes sense to adjust the fat content.
  • People respond differently to carbohydrate content in the diet. Adjustment of carbohydrate content is reasonable.
  • Genetic polymorphisms influence the body’s response to exercise.
  • Genes influence the success of calorie reduction on weight loss.
A very interesting example is the study by the research group (Robitaille et al., Clin Genet 63: 109-116, 2003), which found in 720 subjects that when they were fed a particularly high-fat diet, only those who had the less favorable variant of the PPARG gene (Pro12Ala) gained weight. A genetic effect that was confirmed by the independent research group (Memisoglu et al., Human Molecular Genetics 12: 2923-2929, 2001) in a separate study. By knowing about this genetic defect, the body's response to a high-fat or low-fat diet can be predicted.
A study in the Journal of Nutrition demonstrated that people with the Gln27Glu polymorphism in the ADRB2 gene had a significantly higher tendency to be overweight (OR: 2.56) when they obtained more than 49% of daily calories from carbohydrates.
Conclusions can therefore be drawn from these two genetic tendencies as to who is more sensitive to the amount of carbohydrates and fats in the diet. Thus, according to the 16 previously mentioned publications, if a person is less sensitive to the amount of fat in the diet, and according to this publication, this person shows a tendency to be overweight only if the carbohydrate calorie content is above 49%, it can be concluded that a higher fat content and a lower carbohydrate content will have a positive effect on body weight. A person with the correct polymorphisms will demonstrably not gain weight if, within the parameters studied, the proportion of fat in the diet is increased and the proportion of carbohydrate is decreased.
The effectiveness of exercise for weight loss is very much influenced by genes. The study (Diabetes Obes Metab. 2002 Nov;4(6):428-30.) is one of many that showed that individuals with a particular gene variant in the ADRB2 gene had a significant genetic propensity to be overweight, but only if they led an inactive lifestyle. When these individuals exercised, the gene defect had no effect on their propensity to be overweight. Thus, the effect of the gene defect could be reversed by a lifestyle change. An independent study on the same gene showed (Diabetes Care. 1997 Dec;20(12):1887-90.) that individuals with the less favorable variant of the gene lost significantly less weight through exercise than individuals with the favorable variant, even though they had exerted themselves just as much as the control group. These individuals simply respond less quickly and well to exercise as a weight loss strategy. These significant differences in weight loss success are familiar to every gym worker. This genetic effect has been confirmed by many more studies (Eur J Intern Med. 2007 Dec;18(8):587-92, Obes Res. 2004 May;12(5):807-15., Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2003 Sep;27(9):1028-36)

Legend = Your personal analysis result (marked with an X)

GENOTYP = The different variants of the gene (called alleles)

POP = Percentage distribution of the different genetic variants in the population (population)ERG

RESULT POSSIBILITIES = Influence of the genetic variation

Weight loss programm

Fatty acid binding protein-2 (FABP2) belongs to a multigene family with nearly 20 identified members. FABP2, which is exclusively expressed in enterocytes, plays a central role in the uptake of long-chain fatty acids into the cell and their transport within the cell.
Accordion Sample DescriPPARG (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma) is a type II intracellular receptor. These receptors are activated via physiological or pharmacological ligands and regulate the transcriptional activity of various target genes. The rs1801282 polymorphism is associated with both obesity and increased risk for type II diabetes. ption
This transmembrane protein (β2-adrenergic receptor) belongs to the family of metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptors and is activated by binding of its ligand adrenaline. The β2-adrenergic receptors, although widely distributed, are particularly localized on smooth muscle cells and on the membrane of adipocytes. After activation of the receptor by its ligand, relaxation of smooth muscles (e.g., bronchial muscles) or release of the hormone insulin from pancreatic B cells occurs under the influence of the sympathetic nervous system. Insulin release causes blood sugar (glucose) to be stored in the body as glycogen and inhibits the breakdown of fat (lipolysis).
This transmembrane protein (β2-adrenergic receptor) belongs to the family of metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptors and is activated by binding of its ligand adrenaline. The β2-adrenergic receptors, although widely distributed, are particularly localized on smooth muscle cells and on the membrane of adipocytes. After activation of the receptor by its ligand, relaxation of smooth muscles (e.g., bronchial muscles) or release of the hormone insulin from pancreatic B cells occurs under the influence of the sympathetic nervous system. Insulin release causes blood sugar (glucose) to be stored in the body as glycogen and inhibits the breakdown of fat (lipolysis).
Activation of β-adrenoceptors leads to activation of downstream signal transduction pathways via coupling of bound G proteins. All β-adrenoceptors are able to activate adenylyl cyclase via Gs, which increases the concentration of cAMP in the cytosol and activates protein kinase A via this increase in concentration. The subtype ADRB3 is specifically involved in lipolysis, which is why polymorphisms in this gene are relevant for body weight.
The FTO (Fat mass and obesity-associated protein) gene shows the strongest genetic influence on body weight in humans to date. It has been shown that the rs9939609 polymorphism significantly increases the risk of obesity.
Apolipoproteins are the protein portion of lipoproteins that transports water-insoluble lipids in the blood. Together with phospholipids, the apolipoproteins form the water-soluble (hydrophilic) surface of the lipoproteins, where they act as a structural scaffold and/or recognition and docking molecule, e.g. for membrane receptors. APOA2 forms a structural element and is the activator for the hepatic lipase.
Apolipoprotein A-V plays an important role in the regulation of plasma triglycerides. The rs662799 polymorphism results in elevation of these levels, increasing the risk of coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. In addition, carriers of the G allele have been shown to exhibit modest weight gain on high-fat diets.

BEYOND DNA MY VITAMINS - THE SCIENCE OF GENES.

Beyond DNA MY Vitamins – A micronutrient blend specially formulated for you according to your genes to enhance your innate strengths and balance your weaknesses. Each Beyond DNA MY Vitamins sachet is uniquely formulated for you. There are more than 700 trillion different genetic profiles, only one of which fits you. Each person has different strengths and weaknesses and needs an individual supply of vitamins and trace elements. Take your personal micronutrient blend to give your body what it needs.

The vitamins and minerals are packaged in their processing in small beads, so-called micro-transporters, to be better protected from oxygen and remain stable significantly longer compared to dissolved micronutrients.
The optimal intake of vitamins is a complex issue. Some substances inhibit each other's absorption. Vitamins are absorbed into the body through the same processes/channels. A good example of this is calcium and zinc. When a calcium/zinc powder mixture is taken in a gelatin capsule, both powders are released in the intestine. Calcium, which is typically given in much higher doses, is absorbed through a limited number of calcium channels. However, zinc, which should also be absorbed through these channels, is displaced by the amount of calcium and thus has no effect. So be careful with micronutrients such as effervescent tablets or gelatin capsules that contain calcium and zinc together, for example.
The microtransporters are manufactured in such a way that mutually blocking substances are not located in the same beads. Thus, for example, calcium is released in one part of the intestine and zinc in another. Thus, each of these micronutrients is absorbed far from other blocking micronutrients.
In addition, it is known that certain micronutrients support each other in their absorption. For this reason, vitamin D and calcium, for example, are secreted together from the same microtransporters so that the absorption of the micronutrients is promoted in the best possible way. Certain fat-soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, require carrier fats to be absorbed into the body. For this reason, it is often recommended that vitamin E supplements be taken together with a meal containing fat. In this way, the vitamin E can dissolve in the dietary fat and be absorbed into the body via it. The microtransporters store the vitamin E until it later comes into contact with dietary fats and can then finally be absorbed.
An incorrect dosage form can very quickly lead to the body not being sufficiently supplied with micronutrients. Therefore, with micronutrient preparations, it is always important to pay attention to how and at what rate they are delivered to the body.
Most micronutrient supplements dissolve immediately in water and are thus also immediately delivered to the body in the intestines and absorbed into the bloodstream. This has some significant disadvantages: Vitamin C is removed from the body very quickly; with a half-life of 30 minutes, the body loses half of the vitamin C in the blood every half hour. Of the typical daily amount of 80 mg of vitamin C, only about 5 mg is left after just 2 hours. After 4 hours, there is less than 1 mg and thus below the effective limit.
Continuous supply through microtransporters. So, since the body degrades vitamin C very quickly, it is necessary to constantly supply the body with small amounts of vitamin C. The micro-transporters are designed to slowly release the contained vitamins and minerals to the body throughout the day. Thus, your body is constantly supplied with the optimal dose of the vitamin.
Science is always coming up with new discoveries in the field of genetics, disease prevention and micronutrients. Because your personalized micronutrient blend is a lifelong micronutrient supplement, we have the ability to customize each new blend to reflect new circumstances such as your age, new scientific findings, and current recommendations in healthy nutrition. Therefore, the individual micronutrient amounts will change slightly from order to order and will be individually adjusted to reflect new circumstances. Thus, with your personalized micronutrient blend, you will have a product composed exactly according to your genes, and always according to the latest science and technology.
Different analyses from our portfolio can influence the composition of your personal micronutrient blend. Thus, it does not matter whether you have performed an analysis for healthy nutrition, an analysis for better athletic performance or an analysis for optimal micronutrient supply of breast milk. All the results we have available will be automatically integrated at no extra cost.

BEYOND DNA MEDICATION - THE SCIENCE OF GENES

How drugs work in our bodies

Everyone reacts differently to medications, and while some derive significant benefit from drug treatment, adverse side effects can cause severe complications and even fatal consequences in others. It is estimated that about 7% of hospital patients experience serious side effects and about 0.4% of you die as a result. Drug side effects are the fifth leading cause of death in the Western world and a large proportion of these cases are due to drug intoxication. Another portion is triggered due to the effects of drugs on each other, known as interactions.

When a drug is swallowed or injected with a needle, it first enters the bloodstream, through which it is transported to the target organ. The drugs are then recognized by an endogenous enzyme and prepared for degradation from the bloodstream, where most drugs lose their effect.

The deactivated drug is then filtered out of the blood by the kidneys and ultimately

and ultimately excreted in the urine

Long-term drug therapy

Because many medications should work for a long period of time, they are taken regularly to keep the amount of effective drug in the right range.

In this way, the drug always stays at the right dosage to have its intended effect.

Genetic defects delay the breakdown of the drug

Unfortunately, many people have a genetic defect in one of the enzyme genes that play an important role in this process. In this case, the drug still ends up in the bloodstream and shows its effect, but it is not prepared for degradation and remains in the body much longer. This is hardly a problem when taken once, but if the drug is taken 3 times a day, the concentration in the blood increases until toxic side effects occur.

The problem with repeated use when a genetic defect is present

In the case of certain blood thinners, the blood thinning is initially in the right range, but if the drug is taken continuously, the concentration of the drug continues to increase, showing more and more blood-thinning or anticoagulant effects, until uncontrollable bleeding occurs.

This means that for 20% of the population carrying a genetic defect, a much lower dose of the drug is necessary, as the usual dose would lead to severe side effects.

Pro-drugs, the precursor to active drugs

Some drugs, called “pro-drugs,” are taken in an inactive form and converted to the active form by the body’s enzymes. Examples of such drugs are the cancer drug tamoxifen and the painkiller codeine. When such a drug is ingested, it enters the bloodstream, where it is then converted to the active form and produces its desired effect. The painkiller codeine is converted in this way into morphine, which has a pain-relieving effect.

However, if the enzyme gene is defective, the body cannot convert the drug into the active form and the drug thus shows no effect, but very much side effects.

In the case of codeine, pain relief does not set in after administration and the patient must switch to another drug.

However, in the case of Tamoxifen, a drug that prevents the development of breast cancer, the lack of effect of the drug is not noticeable and one is not aware of it until metastases develop.

Evaluation of medications

Using the Beyond DNA Medication analysis, we gain insight into the status of your drug metabolism genes and can assess how the degradation and activation pathways of the various drugs are affected in you. From this information, medications and active ingredients were individually assessed for you in 3 categories (effect, degradation, dose). This information will help your doctor in the correct selection and dosage of your medication. A simple symbolism shows you how the effect, the degradation or the dose of the active substance is.

You can find an excerpt here:

BEYOND DNA HEALTH - THE SCIENCE OF GENES

The human body consists of about 50 trillion individual cells, and in most of these cells there is a cell nucleus containing the human chromosomes. A chromosome consists of a “tightly wound thread” called the DNA double helix.

The DNA is the actual genetic code, i.e. the blueprint of the human body. In every human being, this genetic code consists of about 3.2 billion letters and about 1% of this code represents the areas we call genes. A gene is an instruction for the body and usually has only one specific function. For example, there are genes whose function is to tell the body how to produce blue dyes, which then lead to blue eyes. There are also genes that tell the body how to break down food in the intestines so that it can then absorb the nutrients.

Unfortunately, our genes are not flawless and each of us carries certain gene defects or gene variations that we either inherited from our parents or that formed by chance and now negatively affect our health. These gene variations are very common and are usually just simple letter changes in the genetic code. The different variations weaken our immune system, increase our risk of heart attack, or give us bad eyesight. Of course, each of us carries different variations, which means that some people have a higher risk of heart attack and others cannot tolerate lactose, for example. Diseases clustered in certain families are a good example of how individual disease risk can vary from family to family and person to person.

These gene variations can influence our health, but in many cases they do not represent absolute facts of getting a disease, only an increased risk of disease. Whether the disease breaks out depends on external influences and lifestyle. For example, if a person cannot tolerate lactose due to a genetic variation, this person is perfectly healthy as long as he or she does not consume any dairy products. Complaints only arise when certain environmental influences occur, in this case lactose intake through food. It is the same with other diseases. For example, if an iron absorption regulation gene is defective, this increases the risk of iron storage disease, and a precautionary lifestyle is necessary to prevent the disease and perhaps prevent it altogether.

Experts estimate that each person carries about 2,000 gene defects or gene variations, which in total affect his or her health and body and in some cases cause disease. A variety of influences can cause changes in our genes (also called mutations), which in rare cases can have positive effects, but most often disrupt the function of the gene and negatively affect our health.

The most well-known cause of genetic defects in the media is radioactivity, whereby radioactive rays penetrate cells and damage our genetic code and thus, by chance, our genes.

Another cause of mutations and genetic defects are certain substances, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are found, for example, on grilled food. They also enter cells and damage our genes, which can lead to colon and some other cancers. UV radiation from the sun also damages our genes, leading to diseases such as skin cancer.

These influences can alter individual genes and disrupt their function throughout our lives, but we inherit the majority of our gene variations from our parents. Each embryo receives half of the father’s genes and half of the mother’s genes when the egg is fertilized, which together create a new human being with some of the characteristics of each parent. With these genes, unfortunately, genetic defects are also passed on, and so it happens that, for example, a polymorphism that causes heart attacks is passed from father to son and on to grandson, leading to the disease in each generation. However, whether the genetic defect is passed on is determined by chance, and so some of the grandchildren may carry the genetic defect and others may not.

In this way, each person is unique and through the accumulation and combination of the different genetic variations, each person has different inherited health weaknesses but also strengths. With the latest technology, it is now finally possible to examine one’s own genes and read from them which very personal health risks exist. With this knowledge, preventive measures can then be taken and diseases prevented in many cases. This is the next step in preventive medicine and a new generation of health care.

Action Need Overview

The Beyond DNA Health analysis provides you with an overview of which genetic diseases may pose a risk to you. However, it is essential that lifestyle and nutrition have a positive or negative influence on the onset of diseases. Here you can see an excerpt of an evaluation:

Risks that are in the orange/red area should be discussed with your doctor. The other areas do not show a generally increased risk and, provided there is no disease, do not require any special action.

You can see an excerpt of the detailed evaluation here: